Herald: Dancing to Goan rhythm
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Dancing to Goan rhythm

12 Dec 2014 11:46pm IST

Report by
Fernando Monte da Silva

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12 Dec 2014 11:46pm IST

Report by
Fernando Monte da Silva

Leave a comment

Nachom-ia Kumpasar is more than your average Konkani feature film. It is a tribute to Goan musicians of the yesteryears. Café talks to the film’s director, Bardroy Barretto, who talks about his cinematic, nostalgic, musical tale

Forget the blockbusters of the week, or for that matter, the year. Let us cast aside for a moment the fact that IFFI, the mother-of-all-film-festivals has just wrapped up. Right now, Goan cinema has a focal point that deserves all the attention that it has been drawing through its new entrant: ‘Nachom-ia Kumpasar’. The creation of Bardroy Barretto, a Bombay-based advertisement producer with roots in Canacona, has been captivating audiences, and with good reason.

Through its storyline, the film uses 20 outstanding Konkani songs to create a narrative with a Goan lilt that conveys a nostalgic tale, one that is set in a time when musicians may have gone unappreciated and (as ironic as it might sound) may have remained unsung. Barretto explains his ideology behind creating a movie of this nature, saying, “My idea was to pay tribute to Goan music and the musicians behind it, because Goan musicians from the glory days of the 60s and 70s certainly did not get their due. Their contribution to Bollywood was paramount and it is fair to say that they were the main people behind its music.”

At times, it is our memories that best serve us, especially those from our childhood. And music has known to have played a critical role in the formative years of almost any individual. Bardroy was no exception to this policy. “This movie is a throwback to the recesses of my memory.The music that I grew up with in Goa between the years 1978 and 1985 is what has spurred on the making of this film. Chris Perry and Lorna’s music was the substitute for television for my generation. Of course, as is the case with certain aspects of things in Goa, hearsay played a big role too. In fact, I can state comfortably that hearsay is a basis for the film. There were many rumours about the relationship that the two shared, which serves as the spine of the story. But their songs dictated their lives and they do the same with the storyline. This is primarily why music is the true hero of the film,” says Bardroy.

The launch of the film is in stark contrast to the bigger and perhaps ‘deeper pocketed’ Bollywood release from Anurag Kashyap, ‘Bombay Velvet’. His drama that is based on the 1960s life of the country’s jazz hub features elaborate sets, bigger budgets and big names such as Ranbir Kapoor and Anushka Sharma. However,while the film is still months from its release, Bardroy’s pet project, set in the same era, has won the hearts of audiences both local and (thanks to the generous English subtitles) foreign audiences.

The soundtrack and score have been artistically crafted in order to ensure their chronological order which ties into the relationship shared by the two characters. “From flirtation, to falling in love, to falling out of love again, it’s all in there,” explains Bardroy.

Containing all the elements that are required to recreate an era that will probably never be touched again, Bardroy’s film is certainly one worth watching especially as keeping with Goan rhythm is something one just can’t ‘beat’.

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