Herald: The space is calling
Herald News

The space is calling

10 Nov 2017 05:37am IST
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10 Nov 2017 05:37am IST
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The Story of Space, said to be a free, public festival of discovery and inquiry, begins today in the capital city of Panjim. Put together by a creative community comprising artistes, scientists and educators, the 10-day festival will have plenty of action in the form of installations, workshops and performances, across 18 different venues in Goa

Starting today, the city of Panjim will be transformed

into a learning playground with live experiences,

immersive installations, workshops, talks, films and

panels on questions around space from multiple

perspectives. The Story of Space, a community-driven

initiative by a team that works tirelessly on the various

projects, with numerous collaborations making the

event possible, begins today. The follow-up to ‘The

Story of Light’ held two years ago, The Story of Space

has engaged researchers, artists and educators from

around the globe to create works with general or specific

learning outcomes for audiences that they would not

normally engage with. The festival presents and evaluates

about 73 interesting projects on the theme of space.

Some of the highlights of the festival include a

Mumbai based duo, Akash and Thomas, who go by the

name ‘Sound.Codes’. The duo has collaborated with

the Archaeological Survey of India and Directorate of

Archives and Archaeology, Goa, to acoustically map

45 sites across Goa, covering its heritage and

culture, reproducing and archiving the sights and

sounds of Goa at the Fundação Oriente building.

Over the 10-day festival, US based Migratory

Cultures will project local and international

narratives around people’s experiences of

migration, including stories of migration unique

to the Goan diaspora, all over the city. The

programme also has panels making relevant

inquiries like “What is sustainable development

to Goa?”, a focus group on “What learning in

the 21st century should look like in India and

internationally”, and talks by the likes of NASA

scientist Henry Throop, exploring the question,

“Are we alone in the universe?”

The opening ceremony starting today at 6 pm

will have brief talks by key organisers Jaya Ramchandani,

Shrinivas Ananthanarayan, Shaira Sequeira Shetty, Rahul

Gudipudi and Akshay Roongta about what to expect at

the Story of Space and about the next festival, The Story

of Mind. There will be two live experiences – a video

mapping oriented Migratory Cultures in the foyer by

US based G Craig Hobbs and Robin Lasser. Migratory

Cultures is a global, multidisciplinary, collaborative

art project currently involving students, artists and

professors from San José State University in the Bay

Area, California, and Srishti Institute of Art, Design and

Technology in Bangalore, India. The project explores

topics of migration, diaspora, flow and trace documented

in communities and projected using video mapping

techniques onto urban architecture. Migratory Cultures

has exhibited extensively in the Bay Area and is currently

working in Bangalore, India to connect regional

experiences of immigration with stories from around

the world. Currently, they are collecting, editing and

translating local stories of immigration in Hindi, Kannada

and English in Bangalore, India. Previous projections

have been developed and presented in Watsonville,

Oakland, San José and San Francisco, California.

Imagery includes portraits of immigration stories as told

by people representing 15 unique countries including

India, Mongolia, Russia, Mexico, Bosnia, Pakistan, Japan,

Vietnam, Germany, Ethiopia, Mexico, Latin America,

Yemen, Iran and France.

Another live experience that will take place is Satellite

Sonata,by Robin Meier and Santiago Lusardi Girelli,

curated by Shazeb Sheikh, which is a sound and music

based performance. Launched in 2006, the European

Space Agency’s CoRoT satellite measures the minuscule

variations of the light of the stars. This twinkling of

the stars can be translated into sound through digital

synthesis. Using techniques of spectral composition

and various contemporary notations, these sounds of

the stars are then re-transcribed for brass ensemble.

Through close collaboration, a local Indian brass

ensemble, unfamiliar with contemporary music and

playing styles is going to be trained in the interpretation

of this score. Over two weeks, through recordings,

videos and workshops the musicians learn to play these

new sounds and will collectively elaborate this new

music.

There are plenty of installations and workshops,

most of whom are complex yet extremely interesting

and creatively put together, happening across the 18

venues over the duration of the festival. They say, “The

best things in life don’t come free.” The Story of Space is

an exception as all installations and live experiences will

be open to the public from November 11, 2017 onwards.
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