Herald: No much change in temperatures from last year, says Met

No much change in temperatures from last year, says Met

16 Apr 2019 06:12am IST

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16 Apr 2019 06:12am IST

Report by
Team Herald

Goa experiences soaring heat due to high humidity, says scientist

PANJIM: Complains of soaring temperatures and dehydration can be heard from every second person on the street, but data figures indicate that temperatures in 2019 are lesser compared to earlier years.

For this month up to April 14, the average temperatures are almost similar as compared to 2018 as well as 2017 with a slight variation. However, March has seen a slight dip in temperature when compared during the same period. 

This year March recorded a maximum of 32.1 degree Celsius and minimum of 22.1 and the mean temperature was 27.1 degree Celsius. In 2018, MET data shows that it was 33.2, 23.2 and 28.2 degree Celsius respectively and in 2017, it was recorded as 33.5, 22.9 and 28.2 degree Celsius respectively. 

However, the general perception is that temperatures are increasing as compared to previous years. “I don’t feel like coming out of the house, but inside the house too it’s the same. You sweat all through the day if you are not in an AC room or vehicle. Whether you are at home, office or travelling in the bus, it just gets exhausting and by the end of the day you feel you have been drained out”, complained a young woman working in a private agency.

When the complain was taken up with the Met department, Scientist Dr SD Sanap informed that the average temperatures are almost similar as compared to last year with a slight dip in the average. 

“The temperatures are almost similar, however, due to higher humidity one feels hot and exhausted. Compared to other cities’ temperatures, Goa’s are much better but there humidity levels are low whereas in Goa humidity levels are high and therefore this feeling of increasing heat. In other cities the humidity levels are less than 60 per cent whereas in Goa humidity is more than 70 per cent”, he added.

Responding to a question on actual temperatures and what the temperature feels like as provided by some of the weather forecast apps, he said that a combination of factors imply in feel like temperature being high including humidity.

Experts say that on a hot but dry day, the body cools itself as sweat evaporates, causing evaporational cooling to occur whereas when there is an abundance of moisture in the air (humidity), sweat does not evaporate as readily, making it feel much hotter.



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